Daily Archives: May 17, 2017

Addivant Announces Temporary Surcharge on a Series of Antioxidants Following Severe Shortage in Isobutylene in Europe

DANBURY, Conn., May 17, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Following an abrupt shortage of isobutylene in Europe that started in March 2017, Addivant™, a global leader in polymer additives, will apply a temporary 25% price surcharge on the following list of Antioxidants: ANOX®IC-14, LOWINOX®1790, LOWINOX®22IB46, LOWINOX®22M46, LOWINOX®44B25, LOWINOX®CA-22, LOWINOX®CPL, LOWINOX®TBM6, LOWINOX®ROSIN6 and LOWINOX®TBP6. The temporary surcharge is effective immediately. Addivant has taken and will continue to take significant measures to mitigate the impact on the availability of these products and remains committed to maintaining uninterrupted delivery to its customers.

About Addivant™
Addivant™ is an innovator in the field of polymer additives, developing customized solutions that provide customers enhanced application performance, safe handling, and reduction in cost of use. The company is recognized industry-wide for its extensive portfolio of specialty additives including antioxidants, light stabilizers, rubber additives, polymer modifiers, metal deactivators, polymerization inhibitors and intermediates. Addivant is an international company, with 11 plants in five regions as well as research, manufacturing and sales facilities around the globe. Addivant maintains its global headquarters in Connecticut, USA with regional headquarters in: Al Jubail, Saudi Arabia, Basel, Switzerland, and Shanghai, China. Addivant is an independent portfolio company of SK Capital. Visit https://www.addivant.com/about-us for more information.

Addivant™, ANOX® and LOWINOX® are trademarks of Addivant.

Contacts:
Beverly Kindermann
[email protected]com
Tel: +1 203 702 6182

Advanced Energy Solid-State Matching Network Selected for Plasma Impedance Matching in <14 nm Semiconductor Etch Applications

Company Reveals Design Win on Major OEM Etch Tool with Navigator® II FastCap™ Solid-State Matching Network

FORT COLLINS, Colo., May 17, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Advanced Energy Industries, Inc. (Nasdaq:AEIS), a global leader in precision power conversion, announced today that its solid-state matching network has been selected by one of the world’s largest suppliers of semiconductor manufacturing equipment. The ultra-fast Navigator® II FastCap™ solid-state matching network provides greater capability, productivity and performance, enabling increased predictability and reproducibility in sub-14 nm plasma processes.

The latest addition to the Navigator II platform, FastCap solid-state technology enables tuning speeds more than 100X faster than conventional, mechanically operated, variable vacuum capacitors. When combined with Navigator II digital instrumentation and controls, the patented, hot-switchable capacitors follow the fastest process transitions in real time—offering a distinct advantage over standard vacuum capacitors and resulting in improved run-to-run process repeatability.

Yuval Wasserman, president and CEO of Advanced Energy, said, “Customer partnerships in evaluating new technologies are core to our leadership in precision power. This design win reflects our deep expertise in RF power and a collaborative effort to understand and respond to unique process challenges and dynamic plasma characteristics, in order to produce a stable and significant tune-time advantage. The best-selling Navigator II platform—the industry’s first digital matching network—combined with FastCap solid-state technology is the answer to the manufacturing of thinner films and finer features in rapid, complex, multi-step processes.”

Advanced Energy leads in RF power conversion with more than 400,000 units shipped worldwide. The FastCap solution is qualified for use with AE’s Paramount® line of RF power supplies. Currently in volume production, this product is available for many PECVD and etch bias applications.

About Advanced Energy

Advanced Energy (Nasdaq:AEIS) is a global leader in innovative power and control technologies for high-growth, precision power solutions for thin films processes and industrial applications. Advanced Energy is headquartered in Fort Collins, Colorado, with dedicated support and service locations around the world. For more information, go to www.advanced-energy.com.

CONTACT:

Christina Liebman
Director, Corporate Marketing 
Advanced Energy Industries, Inc.
+1.970.407.6444

Radical Burmese Buddhist Monk Is Subject of Documentary at Cannes Film Festival

YANGON � Ashin Wirathu, the Burmese Buddhist monk known for whipping up anti-Muslim sentiment in Myanmar, is the subject of a new documentary airing at France’s renowned Cannes Film Festival, which starts Wednesday.

By filmmaker Barbet Schroeder, The Venerable W will appear in a special screening at one of the most prestigious cultural events in the world, marking the culmination of Wirathu’s journey from an obscure rabble-rouser to international infamy.

But his path to notoriety abroad points to questions back home about how much of a role the media have played in fueling his rise. Some believe he has been given too much of a platform for his hateful views or that coverage of his activities merits a more thoughtful approach.

Media attention for anti-Muslim views

He has been famous because of the interviews and because of the posts in the local media, said Thitsa Hla Htway, secretary of the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Myanmar.

He urged journalists to not report his more repugnant musings and to report on more diverse issues.

What I want to stress is that they should just stay away from him and his popularity will go down. There are many important issues in Myanmar which are more important than him, he said.

In and out of prison

This wasn’t the feeling five years ago, when Myanmar was emerging from military rule and grappling with ascendant Buddhist nationalist forces in the form of the 969 movement and Ma Ba Tha, the Committee to Protect Race and Religion.

Sentenced to prison for 25 years in 2003 for inciting violence, Wirathu was released in an amnesty in 2012, the same year that saw the first of several deadly riots to plague the country’s transition to democracy from nearly five decades of military rule.

‘Time magazine’ interview

Though Myanmar has long struggled to contain religious enmity, the story was not often heard outside of the country due to its isolation. That changed with a 2013 TIME magazine issue that put Wirathu on the cover and sought to explain the man’s connection to the mayhem.

The initial coverage was revealing, but over the years, Wirathu was interviewed by countless journalists, including the author of this article. Doubt crept into the worthiness of the enterprise for many journalists.

Social media star

But his following on social media is enormous, his posts can be inflammatory, and the fact that he has not faced strong pushback implies he has connections.

Thiha Saw, the director of the Myanmar Journalism Institute, said he credits Wirathu’s rise more to the explosion of internet access that has occurred in recent years. He added that mainstream media outlets in Myanmar have been cautious about not giving Wirathu an unnecessary amount of exposure.

Supported military

But his level of influence remains an open question. He supported the military-backed ruling party in a 2015 election contest against Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy, which won easily. This past March, Wirathu was hit with a ban on giving sermons for one year.

Even so, he was allowed to travel to a part of northern Rakhine State this month that has been largely closed off to observers since Rohingya militants attacked border posts in October, killing nine and setting off a crackdown that has resulted in accusations of possible crimes against humanity.

British journalist Oliver Slow, the chief of staff for the weekly magazine Frontier Myanmar, said in his personal opinion there needs to be a mix of scrutiny and restraint in the reporting.

Journalists want more scrutiny of Wirathu

I think obviously he [Wirathu] needs to be heavily scrutinized. His group and the people behind him have the potential to cause massive issues, so I think it’s important to be reporting on him and what they are doing, Slow said. But I think we pretty much know all his views now, they’ve been aired for the past four or five years. His views on Muslims, his views on religion, have been so well aired, I just don’t really see any benefit any more of interviewing him.

Matthew Smith, executive director of the NGO Fortify Rights, said in an email he isn’t persuaded by arguments the media has disproportionately fueled Wirathu’s rise to power, even if Wirathu has benefited from the attention.

Wirathu is a populist demagogue with a considerable following and powerful connections behind the scenes, Smith said. But he and his followers have unarguably used international media attention to their advantage, to build their prominence and advance nationalist and racist narratives.

Smith wants more investigative coverage of Wirathu.

We see the occasional profile piece and don’t find those terribly helpful. Most foreign readers, particularly in the West, regard Buddhism as a tranquil religion of peace, so editors have endless fodder in stories of an extremist monk who preaches hatred.”

Schroeder, the filmmaker, did not immediately respond to a request for an interview sent through his production company.

Source: Voice of America

Guards Fire on Scavengers at Myanmar Jade Mine, Killing Four

Guards working at a jade mine in northwestern Myanmar’s Sagaing region fired on migrant workers trying to scavenge gems from the site on Wednesday, killing four, sources in the country said.

The incident at the Nansibon Jade Mine near Hkamti township came amid growing tensions between companies working at the site and scavengers trespassing on authorized mining areas.

Wednesday’s shooting by armed security guards left four dead and 11 others wounded, a Hkamti resident told RFA’s Myanmar Service.

Four people were killed and 11 were injured, Aung San Myint told RFA. Five out of the 11 were sent to a hospital, and the others are on their way there now.

Also speaking to RFA, U Kawwida, a Buddhist monk who visited the wounded workers in the hospital, said the scavengers had entered the mining site on Wednesday morning to search for jade, adding, They had to run away because police shot at them.

Four were killed, and five were sent to a hospital, he said. One of them is now in critical condition.

Freelance miners had been warned not to enter the mine, which is operated by the military-backed Union of Myanma Economic Holdings Ltd. (UMEHL), local lawmaker Maung Tay told the Agence France-Press (AFP) news service on Wednesday.

But the miners went there this morning and they shot them, Maung Tay said, quoted by AFP.

Clashes common

Hundreds of migrant workers have moved into Nansibon in recent years to search for cast-off stones, and clashes between scavengers and mining companies are now common, The Myanmar Times said in an April 28 report.

Company property and assets have been damaged by migrant workers who search for jade in restricted areas, the Times said.

At one company alone, seven dump trucks, four backhoes and about 120 fuel barrels, as well as towers and fences were destroyed, the Times said, adding that company employees have also been threatened.

No solution has been found so far, the Times said.

Jade mining by army-linked companies and competing groups in northern Myanmar’s neighboring Kachin state is meanwhile driving ethnic conflict in the war-torn region, making hopes for a nationwide peace settlement difficult to achieve, a new film, “Jade and the Generals,” by the London-based NGO Global Witness says.

Both army units and the ethnic armed groups which oppose them take huge revenues from taxation and extortion in the multi-billion-dollar industry, Global Witness said in a May 17 press release announcing the film’s release.

Kachin’s jade riches need to be managed in the interests of its people, not men with guns, Global Witness said.

Copyright (copyright) 1998-2016, RFA. Used with the permission of Radio Free Asia, 2025 M St. NW, Suite 300, Washington DC 20036

Guards Fire on Scavengers at Myanmar Jade Mine, Killing Four

Guards working at a jade mine in northwestern Myanmar’s Sagaing region fired on migrant workers trying to scavenge gems from the site on Wednesday, killing four, sources in the country said.

The incident at the Nansibon Jade Mine near Hkamti township came amid growing tensions between companies working at the site and scavengers trespassing on authorized mining areas.

Wednesday’s shooting by armed security guards left four dead and 11 others wounded, a Hkamti resident told RFA’s Myanmar Service.

Four people were killed and 11 were injured, Aung San Myint told RFA. Five out of the 11 were sent to a hospital, and the others are on their way there now.

Also speaking to RFA, U Kawwida, a Buddhist monk who visited the wounded workers in the hospital, said the scavengers had entered the mining site on Wednesday morning to search for jade, adding, They had to run away because police shot at them.

Four were killed, and five were sent to a hospital, he said. One of them is now in critical condition.

Freelance miners had been warned not to enter the mine, which is operated by the military-backed Union of Myanma Economic Holdings Ltd. (UMEHL), local lawmaker Maung Tay told the Agence France-Press (AFP) news service on Wednesday.

But the miners went there this morning and they shot them, Maung Tay said, quoted by AFP.

Clashes common

Hundreds of migrant workers have moved into Nansibon in recent years to search for cast-off stones, and clashes between scavengers and mining companies are now common, The Myanmar Times said in an April 28 report.

Company property and assets have been damaged by migrant workers who search for jade in restricted areas, the Times said.

At one company alone, seven dump trucks, four backhoes and about 120 fuel barrels, as well as towers and fences were destroyed, the Times said, adding that company employees have also been threatened.

No solution has been found so far, the Times said.

Jade mining by army-linked companies and competing groups in northern Myanmar’s neighboring Kachin state is meanwhile driving ethnic conflict in the war-torn region, making hopes for a nationwide peace settlement difficult to achieve, a new film, “Jade and the Generals,” by the London-based NGO Global Witness says.

Both army units and the ethnic armed groups which oppose them take huge revenues from taxation and extortion in the multi-billion-dollar industry, Global Witness said in a May 17 press release announcing the film’s release.

Kachin’s jade riches need to be managed in the interests of its people, not men with guns, Global Witness said.

Copyright (copyright) 1998-2016, RFA. Used with the permission of Radio Free Asia, 2025 M St. NW, Suite 300, Washington DC 20036